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The Next Chapter in the Book of Life: Structural Genomics
Submitted by Gary Van Domselaar; posted on Friday, July 07, 2000 (1 comment)
Submitter "Now that scientists have effectively determined the complete sequence of human DNA, research teams are gearing up for a follow-on project that many say will be every bit as ambitious and difficult -- but also full of promise for medical research.

The new endeavor focuses on proteins, which are the substances made by the body in response to instructions provided by the genes. It is actually the proteins that form the body and carry out its functions, so they are in some sense of more direct relevance to medicine than the genes themselves.

The Human Genome Project has led to the discovery of genes coding for the production of tens of thousands of proteins. But in most cases, the functions of these genes and their proteins remains unknown. One clue, however, could be provided by the shape of a protein, since proteins interact with other molecules based on their three-dimensional configuration, like keys fitting into locks.

So the new effort, known as structural genomics, aims to determine the three-dimensional structures of thousands upon thousands of proteins, much as the genome project determined gene sequences en masse.

LInk: New York Times (free subscription required):
[link]

Submission by G. Van Domselaar

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plain silly
Submitted by J.W. Bizzaro; posted on Monday, July 10, 2000
Submitter Oh gee, now that we have a rough draft of a map of the genes in the genome, I guess the job of understanding the genome is complete! Time to move on now to protein folding, which NO ONE has been working on! Nonsense.



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plain silly
Submitted by J.W. Bizzaro; posted on Monday, July 10, 2000
Submitter Oh gee, now that we have a rough draft of a map of the genes in the genome, I guess the job of understanding the genome is complete! Time to move on now to protein folding, which NO ONE has been working on! Nonsense.

 

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