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BioInform: Celera to Submit Findings This Fall for Publication
Submitted by Gary Van Domselaar; posted on Monday, July 31, 2000 (1 comment)
Submitter ``Celera Genomics will submit its findings regarding the sequenced human genome to an unnamed scientific journal this fall. `We've agreed to submit things to a scientific journal on or around November 1, with the hope that it would be published before the end of the year,' said Craig Venter, Celera's president and chief scientific officer. Venter declined to say whether the findings would be published in Science or Nature and representatives from both publications declined to comment. Ari Patrinos, associate director of the US Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research Studies, hinted, however, that Science [drlove: I am stunned] would likely be the publisher.''

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Science or Nature
Submitted by J.W. Bizzaro; posted on Monday, July 31, 2000
Submitter Gee, I wonder where this could be published. Well, by itself it is not groundbreaking science. I mean, most of the sequences have been available for a while. And, it's hasn't really been thoroughly analyzed. Heck, much of the anotation isn't done, and we aren't even sure if there are 100,000 or 30,000 genes in the genome! On the other hand, this is very sensationalistic. It's kind of like the discovery that there may be something that looks somewhat like it might be recognizable as what can be assumed to be....hmmm....let me think....water on Mars! And that got published in Science, or was it Nature, who can tell the difference these days. ``Venter declined to say whether the findings would be published in Science or Nature and representatives from both publications declined to comment.'' Ah-ha! I knew it. ``Ari Patrinos, associate director of the US Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research Studies, hinted, however, that Science would likely be the publisher.'' What a shock. I'm amazed. Oh boy. I'm losing more and more respect for Science and Nature every day.



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Science or Nature
Submitted by J.W. Bizzaro; posted on Monday, July 31, 2000
Submitter Gee, I wonder where this could be published. Well, by itself it is not groundbreaking science. I mean, most of the sequences have been available for a while. And, it's hasn't really been thoroughly analyzed. Heck, much of the anotation isn't done, and we aren't even sure if there are 100,000 or 30,000 genes in the genome! On the other hand, this is very sensationalistic. It's kind of like the discovery that there may be something that looks somewhat like it might be recognizable as what can be assumed to be....hmmm....let me think....water on Mars! And that got published in Science, or was it Nature, who can tell the difference these days. ``Venter declined to say whether the findings would be published in Science or Nature and representatives from both publications declined to comment.'' Ah-ha! I knew it. ``Ari Patrinos, associate director of the US Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research Studies, hinted, however, that Science would likely be the publisher.'' What a shock. I'm amazed. Oh boy. I'm losing more and more respect for Science and Nature every day.

 

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