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September 08, 2008, at 11:10 PM by 71.232.99.178 -
Changed lines 18-21 from:

-Eric Martz, November 2007; JTAT Demo added December 10, 2007; JTAT Demo updated January 20, 2008 with Template. SChiSM2 and comparisons added February 15, 2008; Proteopedia, JmolShell, and Jmol's Export to Web Page added May 2008.

to:

-Eric Martz, November 2007; JTAT Demo added December 10, 2007; JTAT Demo updated January 20, 2008 with Template. SChiSM2 and comparisons added February 15, 2008; Proteopedia, JmolShell, and Jmol's Export to Web Page added May 2008. JTAT released September 8, 2008.

September 08, 2008, at 11:08 PM by 71.232.99.178 -
Changed lines 1-2 from:

This is the primary home and download site for the Jmol Tutorial-Authoring Template (JTAT), which was released on September 8, 2008. Be sure to have a look at the JTAT Demonstration !

to:

This is the primary home and download site for the Jmol Tutorial-Authoring Template (JTAT), which was released on September 8, 2008. Be sure to have a look at the JTAT Demonstration !

September 08, 2008, at 11:04 PM by 71.232.99.178 -
Changed lines 1-4 from:

The Jmol Tutorial-Authoring Template (JTAT) is under development. When it has been documented and released, it will be available here. This will be its primary home and download site. Now Available: JTAT Demonstration

Until then, if you are anxious to get started using JTAT for developing tutorials in Jmol, you may use the under-development version by contacting me at emartz AT microbio DOT umass DOT edu.

to:

This is the primary home and download site for the Jmol Tutorial-Authoring Template (JTAT), which was released on September 8, 2008. Be sure to have a look at the JTAT Demonstration !

Please send any questions about this site to emartz AT microbio DOT umass DOT edu.

May 03, 2008, at 02:30 PM by 71.232.99.178 -
Changed lines 18-21 from:

-Eric Martz, November 2007; JTAT Demo added December 10, 2007; JTAT Demo updated January 20, 2008 with Template. SChiSM2 and comparisons added February 15, 2008; Proteopedia and JmolShell added May 2008.

to:

-Eric Martz, November 2007; JTAT Demo added December 10, 2007; JTAT Demo updated January 20, 2008 with Template. SChiSM2 and comparisons added February 15, 2008; Proteopedia, JmolShell, and Jmol's Export to Web Page added May 2008.

May 03, 2008, at 02:29 PM by 71.232.99.178 -
Changed lines 3-4 from:

Until then, if you are anxious to get started on some tutorials in Jmol, you may use the under-development version by contacting me at emartz AT microbio DOT umass DOT edu.

to:

Until then, if you are anxious to get started using JTAT for developing tutorials in Jmol, you may use the under-development version by contacting me at emartz AT microbio DOT umass DOT edu.

May 03, 2008, at 02:28 PM by 71.232.99.178 -
Changed lines 10-11 from:
  • JTAT Download a template for building tutorials that will display in a web browser. Insert molecular views with buttons and descriptions using a text editor. (Proteopedia's Scene Authoring Tools are recommended for creating molecular views to put into JTAT.) Supports multiple chapters and views comparing 2, 3, or 4 molecules side by side (with synchronization of mouse-directed rotations or zooms). Your tutorial will include a slider for zooming (or slabbing), spin toggle and centering buttons, details that display only when requested, and "How To" put views in Powerpoint slides, etc. Extensive help and documentation, including HTML quick-reference. Some knowledge of Jmol script language is helpful, and a little HTML (but no javascript) is involved. Considerably more challenging to use than Proteopedia, but you have more control and the product tutorial is more user friendly. The tutorial must be uploaded to a server to provide online access, or the tutorial can be shown offline.
to:
  • JTAT Download a template for building tutorials that will display in a web browser. Insert molecular views with buttons and descriptions using a text editor. (Proteopedia's Scene Authoring Tools are recommended for creating molecular views to put into JTAT.) Supports multiple chapters and views comparing 2, 3, or 4 molecules side by side (with synchronization of mouse-directed rotations or zooms). Your tutorial will include a slider for zooming (or slabbing), spin toggle and centering buttons, details that display only when requested, and "How To" put views in Powerpoint slides, etc. Extensive help and documentation, including HTML quick-reference. Some knowledge of Jmol script language is helpful, and a little HTML (but no javascript) is involved. Considerably more challenging to use than Proteopedia, but you have more control and the product tutorial is more user friendly. The tutorial must be uploaded to a server to provide online access, or the tutorial can be shown offline. Example tutorial: JTAT Demonstration.
May 03, 2008, at 02:25 PM by 71.232.99.178 -
Changed lines 5-6 from:

JTAT is one of several website-authoring tools for molecular views in the Jmol applet. Those known to me are listed below with comparisons. Please send suggestions for improvement to the email above.

to:

JTAT is one of several website-authoring tools for molecular views in the Jmol applet. Those known to me are listed below.

Unless otherwise indicated, comparisons are by Eric Martz. Please send suggestions for improvement to the email above.

Changed lines 14-15 from:
  • Jmol Application's Export to Web Page On the File menu of the Jmol application (as distinct from the applet) is Export to Web Page. (I intend to provide more information about it here soon.)
to:
  • Jmol Application's Export to Web Page On the File menu of the Jmol application (as distinct from the applet) is Export to Web Page. Jonathan Gutow says: "No knowledge of html or java script is necessary. Some knowledge of Jmol scripting language is helpful, but anything you can do from menus requires no scripting. At present there are two page formats: a Jmol window with scrolling text and buttons on the left side; and a page with snapshots of Jmol images that can be converted to live Jmol by clicking on the images. After Jmol creates the page it can be edited in a standard WYSIWG web page editor to add text and other features."
May 03, 2008, at 02:17 PM by 71.232.99.178 -
Changed lines 5-8 from:

JTAT is one of several website-authoring tools for molecular views in Jmol, listed below with comparisons by Eric Martz:

  • Proteopedia.Org This is a wiki (as in Wikipedia), meaning that anyone can add text and molecular scenes in Jmol to this website. It already has a page for every published macromolecule (>50,000), to which custom molecular scenes may be added. Or you can create a new page on a molecular structure topic, and add new molecular scenes. Proteopedia's Scene Authoring Tools make this by far the easiest place to create rotatable, zoomable molecular scenes which are instantly viewable and searchable by anyone. No knowledge of Jmol scripting language (or javascript) is required. Editing wiki text is easier than HTML. The ease of creating molecular structure tutorials here, and their immediate accessibility online, are the great strengths of Proteopedia. Your tutorials can be protected from editing by others if you wish. Limitations (compared to JTAT) are: Jmol scrolls with the text, so the molecule may scroll out of view when the descriptions are long; Jmol is usually smaller; detail text cannot be hidden; no sliders for zoom/slab; no centering button; no synchronization of side-by-side comparisons. To understand this comparision better, take a look at the JTAT Demonstration vs. Proteopedia.Org.
to:

JTAT is one of several website-authoring tools for molecular views in the Jmol applet. Those known to me are listed below with comparisons. Please send suggestions for improvement to the email above.

  • Proteopedia.Org This is a wiki (as in Wikipedia), meaning that anyone can add text and molecular scenes in Jmol to this website. It already has a page for every published macromolecule (>50,000), to which custom molecular scenes may be added. Or you can create a new page on a molecular structure topic, and add new molecular scenes. Proteopedia's Scene Authoring Tools make this by far the easiest place to create rotatable, zoomable molecular scenes which are instantly viewable and searchable by anyone. No knowledge of Jmol scripting language (nor of javascript) is required. Editing wiki text is easier than HTML. The ease of creating molecular structure tutorials here, and their immediate accessibility online, are the great strengths of Proteopedia. Your tutorials can be protected from editing by others if you wish. Limitations (compared to JTAT) are: Jmol scrolls with the text, so the molecule may scroll out of view when the descriptions are long; Jmol is usually smaller; detail text cannot be hidden; no sliders for zoom/slab; no centering button; no synchronization of side-by-side comparisons. To understand this comparision better, take a look at the JTAT Demonstration vs. Proteopedia.Org.
Added lines 13-14:
  • Jmol Application's Export to Web Page On the File menu of the Jmol application (as distinct from the applet) is Export to Web Page. (I intend to provide more information about it here soon.)
May 01, 2008, at 08:36 PM by 71.232.99.178 -
Changed lines 15-18 from:

-Eric Martz, November 2007; JTAT Demo added December 10, 2007; JTAT Demo updated January 20, 2008 with Template. SChiSM2 and comparisons added February 15, 2008; Proteopedia added May 2008.

to:

-Eric Martz, November 2007; JTAT Demo added December 10, 2007; JTAT Demo updated January 20, 2008 with Template. SChiSM2 and comparisons added February 15, 2008; Proteopedia and JmolShell added May 2008.

May 01, 2008, at 08:35 PM by 71.232.99.178 -
Changed lines 5-6 from:

JTAT is one of several website-authoring tools for molecular views in Jmol, listed below with comparative comments by Eric Martz:

to:

JTAT is one of several website-authoring tools for molecular views in Jmol, listed below with comparisons by Eric Martz:

May 01, 2008, at 08:34 PM by 71.232.99.178 -
Changed lines 11-12 from:
  • JmolShell Download a tutorial-development environment.
to:
  • JmolShell Download a tutorial-development environment to create tutorials that will display in a web browser. Insert molecular views with buttons and descriptions using a text editor. Knowledge of Jmol script language, and a minimal amount of HTML, are required. Considerably more challenging to use than Proteopedia, but you have more control and the product tutorial is more user friendly. The tutorial must be uploaded to a server to provide online access, or the tutorial can be shown offline.
May 01, 2008, at 08:32 PM by 71.232.99.178 -
Added lines 11-12:
  • JmolShell Download a tutorial-development environment.
May 01, 2008, at 08:15 PM by 71.232.99.178 -
Changed lines 11-16 from:
  • SChiSM2 Use a web browser form to create a web page containing a series of molecular views with buttons and descriptions. Requires knowledge of Jmol script language, but neither HTML nor javascript. As of February, 2008, uses an old Jmol (version 10.2). You can save your project to a file and load it later.

-Eric Martz, November 2007; JTAT Demo added December 10, 2007; JTAT Demo updated January 20, 2008 with Template. SChiSM2 and comparisons added February 15, 2008.

to:
  • SChiSM2 Use a web browser form to create a web page containing a series of molecular views with buttons and descriptions. Requires knowledge of Jmol script language, but neither HTML nor javascript. As of May, 2008, uses an old Jmol (version 10.2). You can save your project to a file and upload it later to continue development. Considerably more challenging to use than Proteopedia, but you have more control and the product tutorial is more user friendly. The tutorial must be uploaded to a server to provide online access, or the tutorial can be shown offline.

-Eric Martz, November 2007; JTAT Demo added December 10, 2007; JTAT Demo updated January 20, 2008 with Template. SChiSM2 and comparisons added February 15, 2008; Proteopedia added May 2008.

May 01, 2008, at 08:09 PM by 71.232.99.178 -
Changed lines 9-10 from:
  • JTAT Download a template for building tutorials that will display in a web browser. Insert molecular views with buttons and descriptions using a text editor. (Proteopedia's Scene Authoring Tools are recommended for creating molecular views to put into JTAT.) Supports multiple chapters and views comparing 2, 3, or 4 molecules side by side (with synchronization of mouse-directed rotations or zooms). Your tutorial will include a slider for zooming (or slabbing), spin toggle and centering buttons, details that display only when requested, and "How To" put views in Powerpoint slides, etc. Extensive help and documentation, including HTML quick-reference. Some knowledge of Jmol script language is helpful, and a little HTML (but no javascript) is involved. Considerably more challenging to use than Proteopedia, but you have more control and the product tutorial is more user friendly.
to:
  • JTAT Download a template for building tutorials that will display in a web browser. Insert molecular views with buttons and descriptions using a text editor. (Proteopedia's Scene Authoring Tools are recommended for creating molecular views to put into JTAT.) Supports multiple chapters and views comparing 2, 3, or 4 molecules side by side (with synchronization of mouse-directed rotations or zooms). Your tutorial will include a slider for zooming (or slabbing), spin toggle and centering buttons, details that display only when requested, and "How To" put views in Powerpoint slides, etc. Extensive help and documentation, including HTML quick-reference. Some knowledge of Jmol script language is helpful, and a little HTML (but no javascript) is involved. Considerably more challenging to use than Proteopedia, but you have more control and the product tutorial is more user friendly. The tutorial must be uploaded to a server to provide online access, or the tutorial can be shown offline.
May 01, 2008, at 08:07 PM by 71.232.99.178 -
Changed lines 9-10 from:
  • JTAT Download a template for building tutorials that will display in a web browser. Insert molecular views with buttons and descriptions using a text editor. Supports multiple chapters and views comparing 2, 3, or 4 molecules side by side (with synchronization of mouse-directed rotations or zooms). Your tutorial will include a slider for zooming (or slabbing), spin toggle and centering buttons, details that display only when requested, and "How To" put views in Powerpoint slides, etc. Extensive help and documentation, including HTML quick-reference. Requires knowledge of Jmol script language, and a little HTML (but not javascript).
to:
  • JTAT Download a template for building tutorials that will display in a web browser. Insert molecular views with buttons and descriptions using a text editor. (Proteopedia's Scene Authoring Tools are recommended for creating molecular views to put into JTAT.) Supports multiple chapters and views comparing 2, 3, or 4 molecules side by side (with synchronization of mouse-directed rotations or zooms). Your tutorial will include a slider for zooming (or slabbing), spin toggle and centering buttons, details that display only when requested, and "How To" put views in Powerpoint slides, etc. Extensive help and documentation, including HTML quick-reference. Some knowledge of Jmol script language is helpful, and a little HTML (but no javascript) is involved. Considerably more challenging to use than Proteopedia, but you have more control and the product tutorial is more user friendly.
May 01, 2008, at 08:03 PM by 71.232.99.178 -
Changed lines 7-8 from:
  • Proteopedia.Org This is a wiki (as in Wikipedia), meaning that anyone can add text and molecular scenes in Jmol to this website. It already has a page for every published macromolecule (>50,000), to which custom molecular scenes may be added. Or you can create a new page on a molecular structure topic, and add new molecular scenes. Proteopedia's Scene Authoring Tools make this by far the easiest place to create rotatable, zoomable molecular scenes which are instantly viewable and searchable by anyone. No knowledge of Jmol scripting language (or javascript) is required. Editing wiki text is easier than HTML. The ease of creating molecular structure tutorials here, and their immediate accessibility online, are the great strengths of Proteopedia. Your tutorials can be protected from editing by others if you wish. Limitations (compared to JTAT) are: Jmol scrolls with the text, so the molecule may scroll out of view when the descriptions are long; Jmol is usually smaller; detail text cannot be hidden; no sliders for zoom/slab; no centering button; no synchronization of side-by-side comparisons. To understand this comparision better, take a look at theJTAT Demonstration vs. Proteopedia.Org.
to:
  • Proteopedia.Org This is a wiki (as in Wikipedia), meaning that anyone can add text and molecular scenes in Jmol to this website. It already has a page for every published macromolecule (>50,000), to which custom molecular scenes may be added. Or you can create a new page on a molecular structure topic, and add new molecular scenes. Proteopedia's Scene Authoring Tools make this by far the easiest place to create rotatable, zoomable molecular scenes which are instantly viewable and searchable by anyone. No knowledge of Jmol scripting language (or javascript) is required. Editing wiki text is easier than HTML. The ease of creating molecular structure tutorials here, and their immediate accessibility online, are the great strengths of Proteopedia. Your tutorials can be protected from editing by others if you wish. Limitations (compared to JTAT) are: Jmol scrolls with the text, so the molecule may scroll out of view when the descriptions are long; Jmol is usually smaller; detail text cannot be hidden; no sliders for zoom/slab; no centering button; no synchronization of side-by-side comparisons. To understand this comparision better, take a look at the JTAT Demonstration vs. Proteopedia.Org.
May 01, 2008, at 08:02 PM by 71.232.99.178 -
Changed lines 7-8 from:
  • Proteopedia.Org This is a wiki (as in Wikipedia), meaning that anyone can add text and molecular scenes in Jmol to this website. It already has a page for every published macromolecule (>50,000), to which custom molecular scenes may be added. Or you can create a new page on a molecular structure topic, and add new molecular scenes. Proteopedia's Scene Authoring Tools make this by far the easiest place to create rotatable, zoomable molecular scenes which are instantly viewable and searchable by anyone. No knowledge of Jmol scripting language (or javascript) is required. Editing wiki text is easier than HTML. The ease of creating molecular structure tutorials here, and their immediate accessibility online, are the great strengths of Proteopedia. Your tutorials can be protected from editing by others if you wish.Limitations (compared to JTAT) are: Jmol scrolls with the text, so the molecule may scroll out of view when the descriptions are long; Jmol is usually smaller; detail text cannot be hidden; no sliders for zoom/slab; no centering button; no synchronization of side-by-side comparisons. To understand this comparision better, take a look at theJTAT Demonstration vs. Proteopedia.Org.
to:
  • Proteopedia.Org This is a wiki (as in Wikipedia), meaning that anyone can add text and molecular scenes in Jmol to this website. It already has a page for every published macromolecule (>50,000), to which custom molecular scenes may be added. Or you can create a new page on a molecular structure topic, and add new molecular scenes. Proteopedia's Scene Authoring Tools make this by far the easiest place to create rotatable, zoomable molecular scenes which are instantly viewable and searchable by anyone. No knowledge of Jmol scripting language (or javascript) is required. Editing wiki text is easier than HTML. The ease of creating molecular structure tutorials here, and their immediate accessibility online, are the great strengths of Proteopedia. Your tutorials can be protected from editing by others if you wish. Limitations (compared to JTAT) are: Jmol scrolls with the text, so the molecule may scroll out of view when the descriptions are long; Jmol is usually smaller; detail text cannot be hidden; no sliders for zoom/slab; no centering button; no synchronization of side-by-side comparisons. To understand this comparision better, take a look at theJTAT Demonstration vs. Proteopedia.Org.
May 01, 2008, at 08:02 PM by 71.232.99.178 -
Changed lines 7-8 from:
  • Proteopedia.Org This is a wiki (as in Wikipedia), meaning that anyone can add text and molecular scenes in Jmol to this website. It already has a page for every published macromolecule (>50,000), to which custom molecular scenes may be added. Or you can create a new page on a molecular structure topic, and add new molecular scenes. Proteopedia's Scene Authoring Tools make this by far the easiest place to create rotatable, zoomable molecular scenes which are instantly viewable and searchable by anyone. No knowledge of Jmol scripting language (or javascript) is required. Editing wiki text is easier than HTML. The ease of creating molecular structure tutorials here, and their immediate accessibility online, are the great strengths of Proteopedia. Your tutorials can be protected from editing by others if you wish. Limitations (compared to JTAT) are: Jmol scrolls with the text, so the molecule may scroll out of view when the descriptions are long; Jmol is usually smaller; detail text cannot be hidden; no sliders for zoom/slab; no centering button; no synchronization of side-by-side comparisons. To understand this comparision better, take a look at theJTAT Demonstration vs. Proteopedia.Org.
to:
  • Proteopedia.Org This is a wiki (as in Wikipedia), meaning that anyone can add text and molecular scenes in Jmol to this website. It already has a page for every published macromolecule (>50,000), to which custom molecular scenes may be added. Or you can create a new page on a molecular structure topic, and add new molecular scenes. Proteopedia's Scene Authoring Tools make this by far the easiest place to create rotatable, zoomable molecular scenes which are instantly viewable and searchable by anyone. No knowledge of Jmol scripting language (or javascript) is required. Editing wiki text is easier than HTML. The ease of creating molecular structure tutorials here, and their immediate accessibility online, are the great strengths of Proteopedia. Your tutorials can be protected from editing by others if you wish.Limitations (compared to JTAT) are: Jmol scrolls with the text, so the molecule may scroll out of view when the descriptions are long; Jmol is usually smaller; detail text cannot be hidden; no sliders for zoom/slab; no centering button; no synchronization of side-by-side comparisons. To understand this comparision better, take a look at theJTAT Demonstration vs. Proteopedia.Org.
May 01, 2008, at 08:01 PM by 71.232.99.178 -
Changed lines 7-8 from:
  • Proteopedia.Org This is a wiki (as in Wikipedia), meaning that anyone can add text and molecular scenes in Jmol to this website. It already has a page for every published macromolecule (>50,000), to which custom molecular scenes may be added. Or you can create a new page on a molecular structure topic, and add new molecular scenes. Proteopedia's Scene Authoring Tools make this by far the easiest place to create rotatable, zoomable molecular scenes which are instantly viewable and searchable by anyone. No knowledge of Jmol scripting language (or javascript) is required. Editing wiki text is easier than HTML. The ease of creating molecular structure tutorials here, and their immediate accessibility online, are the great strengths of Proteopedia. Your tutorials can be protected from editing by others if you wish. Limitations are: Jmol scrolls with the text, so the molecule may scroll out of view when the descriptions are long.
to:
  • Proteopedia.Org This is a wiki (as in Wikipedia), meaning that anyone can add text and molecular scenes in Jmol to this website. It already has a page for every published macromolecule (>50,000), to which custom molecular scenes may be added. Or you can create a new page on a molecular structure topic, and add new molecular scenes. Proteopedia's Scene Authoring Tools make this by far the easiest place to create rotatable, zoomable molecular scenes which are instantly viewable and searchable by anyone. No knowledge of Jmol scripting language (or javascript) is required. Editing wiki text is easier than HTML. The ease of creating molecular structure tutorials here, and their immediate accessibility online, are the great strengths of Proteopedia. Your tutorials can be protected from editing by others if you wish. Limitations (compared to JTAT) are: Jmol scrolls with the text, so the molecule may scroll out of view when the descriptions are long; Jmol is usually smaller; detail text cannot be hidden; no sliders for zoom/slab; no centering button; no synchronization of side-by-side comparisons. To understand this comparision better, take a look at theJTAT Demonstration vs. Proteopedia.Org.
May 01, 2008, at 07:55 PM by 71.232.99.178 -
Changed lines 7-12 from:
  • Proteopedia.Org This is a wiki (as in Wikipedia), meaning that anyone can add text and molecular scenes in Jmol to this website. It already has a page for every published macromolecule (>50,000), to which custom molecular scenes may be added. Or you can create a new page on a molecular structure topic, and add new molecular scenes. Proteopedia's Scene Authoring Tools make this by far the easiest place to create rotatable, zoomable molecular scenes which are instantly viewable and searchable by anyone. No knowledge of Jmol scripting language (or javascript) is required. Editing wiki text is easier than HTML. The ease of creating molecular structure tutorials here, and their immediate accessibility online, are the great strengths of Proteopedia. Your tutorials can be protected from editing by others if you wish. Limitations are: Jmol scrolls with the text, so the molecule may scroll out of view when the descriptions are long.

  • JTAT Download a template for building tutorials that will display in a web browser. Insert molecular views with buttons and descriptions using a text editor. Supports multiple chapters and views comparing 2, 3, or 4 molecules side by side (with synchronization of mouse-directed rotations or zooms). Your tutorial will include a slider for zooming (or slabbing), spin toggle and centering buttons, details that display only when requested, and "How To" put views in Powerpoint slides, etc. Extensive help and documentation, including HTML quick-reference. Requires knowledge of Jmol script language, and a little HTML (but not javascript).

  • SChiSM2 Use a web browser form to create a web page containing a series of molecular views with buttons and descriptions. Requires knowledge of Jmol script language, but neither HTML nor javascript. As of February, 2008, uses an old Jmol (version 10.2). You can save your project to a file and load it later.
to:
  • Proteopedia.Org This is a wiki (as in Wikipedia), meaning that anyone can add text and molecular scenes in Jmol to this website. It already has a page for every published macromolecule (>50,000), to which custom molecular scenes may be added. Or you can create a new page on a molecular structure topic, and add new molecular scenes. Proteopedia's Scene Authoring Tools make this by far the easiest place to create rotatable, zoomable molecular scenes which are instantly viewable and searchable by anyone. No knowledge of Jmol scripting language (or javascript) is required. Editing wiki text is easier than HTML. The ease of creating molecular structure tutorials here, and their immediate accessibility online, are the great strengths of Proteopedia. Your tutorials can be protected from editing by others if you wish. Limitations are: Jmol scrolls with the text, so the molecule may scroll out of view when the descriptions are long.

  • JTAT Download a template for building tutorials that will display in a web browser. Insert molecular views with buttons and descriptions using a text editor. Supports multiple chapters and views comparing 2, 3, or 4 molecules side by side (with synchronization of mouse-directed rotations or zooms). Your tutorial will include a slider for zooming (or slabbing), spin toggle and centering buttons, details that display only when requested, and "How To" put views in Powerpoint slides, etc. Extensive help and documentation, including HTML quick-reference. Requires knowledge of Jmol script language, and a little HTML (but not javascript).

  • SChiSM2 Use a web browser form to create a web page containing a series of molecular views with buttons and descriptions. Requires knowledge of Jmol script language, but neither HTML nor javascript. As of February, 2008, uses an old Jmol (version 10.2). You can save your project to a file and load it later.
May 01, 2008, at 07:50 PM by 71.232.99.178 -
Changed lines 7-8 from:
  • Proteopedia.Org This is a wiki (as in Wikipedia), meaning that anyone can add text and molecular scenes in Jmol to this website. It already has a page for every published macromolecule (>50,000), to which custom molecular scenes may be added. Or you can create a new page on a molecular structure topic, and add new molecular scenes. Proteopedia's Scene Authoring Tools make this by far the easiest place to create rotatable, zoomable molecular scenes which are instantly viewable and searchable by anyone. No knowledge of Jmol scripting language (or javascript) is required. Editing wiki text is easier than HTML. The ease of creating molecular structure tutorials here, and their immediate accessibility online, are the great strengths of Proteopedia. Your tutorials can be protected from editing by others if you wish. Limitations are: Jmol scrolls with the text, so the molecule may scroll out of view when the descriptions are long.
to:
  • Proteopedia.Org This is a wiki (as in Wikipedia), meaning that anyone can add text and molecular scenes in Jmol to this website. It already has a page for every published macromolecule (>50,000), to which custom molecular scenes may be added. Or you can create a new page on a molecular structure topic, and add new molecular scenes. Proteopedia's Scene Authoring Tools make this by far the easiest place to create rotatable, zoomable molecular scenes which are instantly viewable and searchable by anyone. No knowledge of Jmol scripting language (or javascript) is required. Editing wiki text is easier than HTML. The ease of creating molecular structure tutorials here, and their immediate accessibility online, are the great strengths of Proteopedia. Your tutorials can be protected from editing by others if you wish. Limitations are: Jmol scrolls with the text, so the molecule may scroll out of view when the descriptions are long.
May 01, 2008, at 07:48 PM by 71.232.99.178 - Added Proteopedia
Added lines 7-8:
  • Proteopedia.Org This is a wiki (as in Wikipedia), meaning that anyone can add text and molecular scenes in Jmol to this website. It already has a page for every published macromolecule (>50,000), to which custom molecular scenes may be added. Or you can create a new page on a molecular structure topic, and add new molecular scenes. Proteopedia's Scene Authoring Tools make this by far the easiest place to create rotatable, zoomable molecular scenes which are instantly viewable and searchable by anyone. No knowledge of Jmol scripting language (or javascript) is required. Editing wiki text is easier than HTML. The ease of creating molecular structure tutorials here, and their immediate accessibility online, are the great strengths of Proteopedia. Your tutorials can be protected from editing by others if you wish. Limitations are: Jmol scrolls with the text, so the molecule may scroll out of view when the descriptions are long.
February 15, 2008, at 12:15 PM by 128.119.68.58 - Added SChiSM2 and comparison with JTAT
Changed lines 1-2 from:

The Jmol Tutorial-Authoring Template (JTAT) is under development. When it has been documented and released, it will be available here. This will be its primary home and download site.

to:

The Jmol Tutorial-Authoring Template (JTAT) is under development. When it has been documented and released, it will be available here. This will be its primary home and download site. Now Available: JTAT Demonstration

Changed lines 5-10 from:

Now Available: JTAT Demonstration

The Hemoglobin tutorial at MolviZ.Org is in an early version of JTAT. Many improvements are underway since then. There are links to other tutorials there, and more may be found at the World Index of Molecular Visualization Resources, MolVisIndex.Org.

-Eric Martz, November 2007; JTAT Demo added December 10, 2007; JTAT Demo updated January 20, 2008 with Template.

to:

JTAT is one of several website-authoring tools for molecular views in Jmol, listed below with comparative comments by Eric Martz:

  • JTAT Download a template for building tutorials that will display in a web browser. Insert molecular views with buttons and descriptions using a text editor. Supports multiple chapters and views comparing 2, 3, or 4 molecules side by side (with synchronization of mouse-directed rotations or zooms). Your tutorial will include a slider for zooming (or slabbing), spin toggle and centering buttons, details that display only when requested, and "How To" put views in Powerpoint slides, etc. Extensive help and documentation, including HTML quick-reference. Requires knowledge of Jmol script language, and a little HTML (but not javascript).

  • SChiSM2 Use a web browser form to create a web page containing a series of molecular views with buttons and descriptions. Requires knowledge of Jmol script language, but neither HTML nor javascript. As of February, 2008, uses an old Jmol (version 10.2). You can save your project to a file and load it later.

-Eric Martz, November 2007; JTAT Demo added December 10, 2007; JTAT Demo updated January 20, 2008 with Template. SChiSM2 and comparisons added February 15, 2008.

January 20, 2008, at 06:04 PM by 71.232.99.178 - For update of Jan 20, 2008
Changed lines 9-13 from:

-Eric Martz, November 2007; JTAT Demo added December 10, 2007


CREDITS: JTAT started with the dvrblite code kindly provided by Tim Driscoll of molvisions.com for his Jmol Tutorial Template dVR Builder. Driscoll's code was extensively modified by Frieda Reichsman of moleculesinmotion.com to support a tutorial on hemoglobin (available from molviz.org). Frieda incorporated code by Angel HerrŠez to support resizing of Jmol when the window is resized. Eric Martz then extensively modified the "hemoglobin shell" to create JTAT. An early, pre-release version of JTAT was used by Karl Oberholser for a tutorial on collagen (available from molviz.org).

to:

-Eric Martz, November 2007; JTAT Demo added December 10, 2007; JTAT Demo updated January 20, 2008 with Template.

December 10, 2007, at 04:21 PM by 71.232.99.178 -
Changed line 13 from:

CREDITS: JTAT started with the dvrblite code kindly provided by Tim Driscoll of molvisions.com for his Jmol Tutorial Template dVR Builder. Driscoll's code was extensively modified by Frieda Reichsman of moleculesinmotion.com to support a tutorial on hemoglobin (available from molviz.org). Frieda incorporated code by Angel Herraez to support resizing of Jmol when the window is resized. Eric Martz then extensively modified the "hemoglobin shell" to create JTAT. An early, pre-release version of JTAT was used by Karl Oberholser for a tutorial on collagen (available from molviz.org).

to:

CREDITS: JTAT started with the dvrblite code kindly provided by Tim Driscoll of molvisions.com for his Jmol Tutorial Template dVR Builder. Driscoll's code was extensively modified by Frieda Reichsman of moleculesinmotion.com to support a tutorial on hemoglobin (available from molviz.org). Frieda incorporated code by Angel HerrŠez to support resizing of Jmol when the window is resized. Eric Martz then extensively modified the "hemoglobin shell" to create JTAT. An early, pre-release version of JTAT was used by Karl Oberholser for a tutorial on collagen (available from molviz.org).

December 10, 2007, at 04:19 PM by 71.232.99.178 -
Changed line 13 from:

CREDITS: JTAT started with the dvrblite code kindly provided by Tim Driscoll of molvisions.com for his Jmol Tutorial Template dVR Builder. Driscoll's code was extensively modified by Frieda Reichsman of moleculesinmotion.com to support a tutorial on hemoglobin (available from molviz.org). Eric Martz then extensively modified the "hemoglobin shell" to create JTAT. An early, pre-release version of JTAT was used by Karl Oberholser for a tutorial on collagen (available from molviz.org).

to:

CREDITS: JTAT started with the dvrblite code kindly provided by Tim Driscoll of molvisions.com for his Jmol Tutorial Template dVR Builder. Driscoll's code was extensively modified by Frieda Reichsman of moleculesinmotion.com to support a tutorial on hemoglobin (available from molviz.org). Frieda incorporated code by Angel Herraez to support resizing of Jmol when the window is resized. Eric Martz then extensively modified the "hemoglobin shell" to create JTAT. An early, pre-release version of JTAT was used by Karl Oberholser for a tutorial on collagen (available from molviz.org).

December 10, 2007, at 04:00 PM by 71.232.99.178 -
Changed lines 9-10 from:

-Eric Martz, November 2007

to:

-Eric Martz, November 2007; JTAT Demo added December 10, 2007

December 10, 2007, at 03:16 PM by 71.232.99.178 -
Changed lines 3-4 from:

Until then, if you are anxious to get started on some tutorials in Jmol, you may use the under-development version by contacting me at emartz AT microbio DOT umass DOT edu.

to:

Until then, if you are anxious to get started on some tutorials in Jmol, you may use the under-development version by contacting me at emartz AT microbio DOT umass DOT edu.

December 10, 2007, at 03:15 PM by 71.232.99.178 -
Changed lines 5-6 from:

Now Available: JTAT Demonstration

to:

Now Available: JTAT Demonstration

December 10, 2007, at 03:12 PM by 71.232.99.178 -
Changed line 13 from:

CREDITS: JTAT started with the dvrblite code kindly provided by Tim Driscoll of molvisions.com for his Jmol Tutorial Template dVR Builder. Driscoll's code was extensively modified by Frieda Reichsman of moleculesinmotion.com to support a tutorial on hemoglobin (available from molviz.org).

to:

CREDITS: JTAT started with the dvrblite code kindly provided by Tim Driscoll of molvisions.com for his Jmol Tutorial Template dVR Builder. Driscoll's code was extensively modified by Frieda Reichsman of moleculesinmotion.com to support a tutorial on hemoglobin (available from molviz.org). Eric Martz then extensively modified the "hemoglobin shell" to create JTAT. An early, pre-release version of JTAT was used by Karl Oberholser for a tutorial on collagen (available from molviz.org).

December 10, 2007, at 03:10 PM by 71.232.99.178 -
Added lines 10-13:

CREDITS: JTAT started with the dvrblite code kindly provided by Tim Driscoll of molvisions.com for his Jmol Tutorial Template dVR Builder. Driscoll's code was extensively modified by Frieda Reichsman of moleculesinmotion.com to support a tutorial on hemoglobin (available from molviz.org).

December 10, 2007, at 02:26 PM by 71.232.99.178 - Added link to JTAT Demo
Added lines 5-6:

Now Available: JTAT Demonstration

November 15, 2007, at 05:23 PM by 71.232.99.178 -
Changed lines 1-2 from:

The Jmol Tutorial-Authoring Template is under development. When it has been documented and released, it will be available here. This will be its primary home and download site.

to:

The Jmol Tutorial-Authoring Template (JTAT) is under development. When it has been documented and released, it will be available here. This will be its primary home and download site.

Added lines 5-6:

The Hemoglobin tutorial at MolviZ.Org is in an early version of JTAT. Many improvements are underway since then. There are links to other tutorials there, and more may be found at the World Index of Molecular Visualization Resources, MolVisIndex.Org.

November 15, 2007, at 05:17 PM by 71.232.99.178 -
Added lines 1-5:

The Jmol Tutorial-Authoring Template is under development. When it has been documented and released, it will be available here. This will be its primary home and download site.

Until then, if you are anxious to get started on some tutorials in Jmol, you may use the under-development version by contacting me at emartz AT microbio DOT umass DOT edu.

-Eric Martz, November 2007