BI221 Mitochondriomics

From Bioinformatics.Org Wiki

(Difference between revisions)
Jump to: navigation, search
(Added "instructors")
m (Background)
Line 1: Line 1:
==Background==
==Background==
-
Mitochondria are semiautonomous organelles, presumed to be the evolutionary product of a symbiosis between a eukaryote and a prokaryote. The organelle is present in almost all eukaryotic cells in an extent from 103-104 copies. The main function of mitochondria is production of ATP by oxidative phosphorylation and its involvement in apoptosis. The organelles contain almost exclusively maternally inherited mtDNA, and they have specific systems for transcription, translation and replication of mtDNA.
+
Mitochondria are semiautonomous organelles, presumed to be the evolutionary product of a symbiosis between a eukaryote and a prokaryote. The organelle is present in almost all eukaryotic cells in an extent from 10^3-10^4 copies. The main function of mitochondria is production of ATP by oxidative phosphorylation and its involvement in apoptosis. The organelles contain almost exclusively maternally inherited mtDNA, and they have specific systems for transcription, translation and replication of mtDNA.
-
Mitochondrial dysfunction has been correlated with mitochondrial diseases where the clinical pathologies are believed to include infertility, diabetes, blindness, deafness, stroke, migraine and heart-, kidney-, and liver diseases. Recently cancer was added to this list when investigations into human cancer cells from breast, bladder, neck, and lung, revealed a high occurrence of mutations in mtDNA. With the emerging understanding of the role of mitochondria in a vast array of pathalogies, research of mitochondria and mitochondrial dysfunction have in the last decade yielded a huge amount of data in form of publications and databases. Nevertheless, the field of mitochondrial research is still far from exhausted with many unknown factors yet to be discovered.  
+
Mitochondrial dysfunction has been correlated with mitochondrial diseases where the clinical pathologies are believed to include infertility, diabetes, blindness, deafness, stroke, migraine and heart-, kidney-, and liver diseases. Recently cancer was added to this list when investigations into human cancer cells from breast, bladder, neck, and lung, revealed a high occurrence of mutations in mtDNA. With the emerging understanding of the role of mitochondria in a vast array of pathologies, research of mitochondria and mitochondrial dysfunction have in the last decade yielded a huge amount of data in form of publications and databases. Nevertheless, the field of mitochondrial research is still far from exhausted with many unknown factors yet to be discovered.
==Objective==
==Objective==

Revision as of 01:35, 7 October 2007

Contents

Background

Mitochondria are semiautonomous organelles, presumed to be the evolutionary product of a symbiosis between a eukaryote and a prokaryote. The organelle is present in almost all eukaryotic cells in an extent from 10^3-10^4 copies. The main function of mitochondria is production of ATP by oxidative phosphorylation and its involvement in apoptosis. The organelles contain almost exclusively maternally inherited mtDNA, and they have specific systems for transcription, translation and replication of mtDNA.

Mitochondrial dysfunction has been correlated with mitochondrial diseases where the clinical pathologies are believed to include infertility, diabetes, blindness, deafness, stroke, migraine and heart-, kidney-, and liver diseases. Recently cancer was added to this list when investigations into human cancer cells from breast, bladder, neck, and lung, revealed a high occurrence of mutations in mtDNA. With the emerging understanding of the role of mitochondria in a vast array of pathologies, research of mitochondria and mitochondrial dysfunction have in the last decade yielded a huge amount of data in form of publications and databases. Nevertheless, the field of mitochondrial research is still far from exhausted with many unknown factors yet to be discovered.

Objective

The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the various databases and wet-lab methods available. Furthermore the course will through selected articles give an understanding of the pitfalls and limitations of the various databases and methods.

Instructors

Course outline

Course schedule

Access to completed courses is available to enrolled students only, because of privacy and confidentiality issues. If you are interested in an upcoming course, register using instructions below.

Registration

Registration is comprised of two steps. First, create an online account to access the educational section of our website. Second, register for this course by making a payment using either the online registration form (click on the scheduled course above; use this form only for credit card payments via secured PayPal), or by sending in the mail-in registration form (~150 kB PDF, use this form if paying by US checks, credit card or corporate purchase order). Please check the tuition rates and discounts below.

Registration deadline: When full

Tuition discounts

Tuition (all prices USD):

Base tuition If taken with another course at base tuition
Commercial $892 $595
Non-profit/academic $714 $476

For full-time students and the unemployed, please inquire about an additional discount (verification required).

Logistics

http://edu.bioinformatics.org/images/asap_logo.png

Online courses are offered on the ASAP online meeting system. Access information will be provided prior to the start of the course. Each lecture will last 90 to 180 minutes, depending on the topics covered. For those who cannot attend the lectures at those times, the lectures will be recorded and placed on the course website as Flash videos (resolution reduced by 30%) each day, within one day. Students will also be able to communicate with the instructor and other students via the course forums. Lecture attendance is therefore not required.

Since this will be an interactive, hands-on workshop, all attendees will need a computer with a broadband Internet connection (1 Mbps or faster is strongly recommended for those watching the live lecture), a sound card with speakers, a modern Web browser, and the Adobe Flash plugin. Please check the specific system requirements for your computer. A microphone and webcam is not required for this course. The necessary software, lecture notes and exercises will be provided.

ASAP is a trademark of Convoq, Inc.
Other names are trademarks of their respective owners.

Additional information

If you have any questions, please send a message to J.W. Bizzaro (login required) or call +1 508 890 8600.

See also

Personal tools
Namespaces
Variants
Actions
wiki navigation
Toolbox