Bioinformatics.org
Not logged in
  • Log in
  • Bioinformatics.org
    Membership (38237+) Group hosting [?]
  • Wiki
  • Franklin Award
  • Sponsorships
  • Careers
    About bioinformatics
    Bioinformatics training
    Bioinformatics jobs

    Research
    All information groups
    Online databases Online analysis tools Online education tools More tools

    Development
    All software groups
    FTP repository
    SVN & CVS repositories [?]
    Mailing lists

    Forums
    News & Commentary
  • Submit
  • Archives
  • Subscribe

  • Jobs Forum
    (Career Center)
  • Submit
  • Archives
  • Subscribe
  • Latest announcements
    Submit Archive Subscribe

    Submitter

    EXCERPT

    Maverick geneticist George Church, at Harvard University, has announced that he believes he is just two years away from creating a hybrid woolly mammoth embryo. The end goal is to develop a mammoth embryo into a fetus, and to take it to full term, he told New Scientist.

    However, resurrecting a pure woolly mammoth this way is still many years away. First, Church's team is adding key genetic traits – such as shaggy long hair, thick layers of fat and cold-adapted blood – to the genome of the Asian elephant.
    Source: www.newscientist.com/arti[...]s-so/

    Submitter

    EXCERPT

    On Wednesday, the three-judge panel from the Patent Trial and Appeal Board (PTAB) hearing the interference case issued a judgement of no interference-in-fact, stopping UC's bid for intellectual property underpinning the most lucrative applications of genome editing.

    "Broad has persuaded us that the parties claim patentably distinct subject matter," the panel wrote in its decision. "[Broad's] claims, which are all limited to CRISPR/Cas9 systems in a eukaryotic environment, are not drawn to the same invention as UC's claims, which are all directed to CRISPR/Cas9 systems not restricted to any environment."
    Source: www.genomeweb.com/gene[...]-over

    Submitter

    EXCERPT

    Clinical trials for genome editing of the human germline – adding, removing, or replacing DNA base pairs in gametes or early embryos – could be permitted in the future, but only for serious conditions under stringent oversight, says a new report from the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Medicine. The report outlines several criteria that should be met before allowing germline editing clinical trials to go forward. Genome editing has already entered clinical trials for non-heritable applications, but should be allowed only for treating or preventing diseases or disabilities at this time.
    Source: www8.nationalacademies.org/onpi[...]24623

    Submitter

    EXCERPT

    The hope is that other researchers will use the genome data to find other adaptations that will help scientists breed strains of quinoa for various soils and climates around the world. "For example, we discovered mutations which ensure that certain quinoa varieties cannot produce bitter tasting saponins," Robert van Loo, quinoa breeder at Wageningen University in the Netherlands says in the press release. "These 'sweet' varieties do not need to be polished to remove the bitter substances, saving some 15 to 20 per cent. With the new knowledge of quinoa DNA, we can quickly and easily select plants that do not produce bitter substances in the breeding process."
    Source: www.smithsonianmag.com/smar[...]2155/

    Submitter

    In this article, Nitin Baliga gives a quick introduction to systems biology:

    EXCERPT

    Biology is complex. The need to understand this complexity drives advancements in technologies that are required to measure properties of all of the constituent parts and to understand how they interact with one another. The application of those technologies generates large amounts of data, which are analyzed using algorithms or models run on computers.
    Source: missoulian.com/life[...].html

    Submitter

    EXCERPT

    Rare and extinct animals are preserved in jars of alcohol in natural history museum collections around the world, which provide a wealth of information on the changing biodiversity of the planet. But, scientists have not been able to effectively sequence DNA from these specimens until now.
    Source: www.sciencedaily.com/rele[...]7.htm
    Resources: Access over 1.1 million human genomic datasets with 1-click
    Submitted by Craig Smith; posted on Friday, January 27, 2017

    Repositive is the essential portal that helps researchers access genomics data and connect with the research community. By connecting over 39 different global data sources we enable researchers to browse and query over 1.1 million human genomic datasets. By building a community around all this data, we aim to encourage discussions, sharing and collaboration.

    Facilitating faster consumption of higher quality data and sharing knowledge openly is at the very heart of our mission and we have a vision of putting the power of genomic data into the hands of many. The more data we index and the more users who join the community simply gives the collective even more "super powers." The power to find more data quickly, collaborate on science and make incredible discoveries.

    Therefore, we affectionately describe Repositive as "your connection to the genomics collective."

    Try it now with no obligation or signup: discover.repositive.io

    See a list of all the sources indexed on Repositive here: repositive.io/prod[...]rces/

    Find out more about Repositive here: repositive.io
    At Work: Forbes: Illumina adds IBM Watson to DNA test for cancer patients
    Submitted by J.W. Bizzaro; posted on Wednesday, January 11, 2017

    Submitter

    EXCERPT

    Illumina and IBM announced that they would be bundling IBM's Watson Genomics product with Illumina's TruSight Tumor 170, a tool used to help match very sick cancer patients with drugs that might help them.

    The move is the latest effort by DNA sequencing companies to try to get doctors outside major cancer centers like Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York or M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston to try to scan patients' DNA. The idea is that the DNA test results can be used to help patients who don't have any options find medicines – either approved or experimental – that might help them. So far, this is considered standard practice for late-stage non-small cell lung cancer, but not for cancers in general.
    Source: www.forbes.com/site[...]2163e
    Open Access: Bio-IT World: Interference: A CRISPR patent dispute roadmap
    Submitted by J.W. Bizzaro; posted on Tuesday, January 10, 2017

    Submitter

    EXCERPT

    Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer Doudna have become world renowned for their discoveries and development involving CRISPR/Cas9, a gene-editing technology that has been called "one of the most important genetic inventions of our time".

    In 2014, the duo received the 2015 Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences. The following year, Charpentier and Doudna were also co-awarded the €50,000 Princess of Asturias Award of Technical and Scientific Research – commonly referred to as the "Spanish Nobel Prize". The pair also garnered a nomination for the actual Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

    Meanwhile, on April 15, 2014, another genetic researcher, Feng Zhang, was awarded something potentially much more valuable than the Nobel Prize: a patent by the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) for the very same thing for which Charpentier and Doudna have received so many accolades: using CRISPR/Cas9 to edit genes.
    Source: www.bio-itworld.com/2017[...].aspx

    Submitter

    EXCERPT

    HS patients will be assessed by robots under a controversial 111 scheme to use "artificial intelligence" to ease pressures on Accident & Emergency units.

    More than one million people will be given access to a free app which means they can consult with a "chatbot" instead of a human being.

    Hospitals across the country are struggling to cope with unprecedented demand, which has left thousands of casualty patients waiting on trolleys.
    Source: www.telegraph.co.uk/tech[...]line/
    Submit Archive Subscribe
     
    Acknowledgments

    We wish to thank the following for their support:

    [Bio-IT World]
    [Become a sponsor]

     

    Copyright © 2017 · Scilico, LLC