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    Submitter

    ABSTRACT

    Numerous lines of evidence point to a genetic basis for facial morphology in humans, yet little is known about how specific genetic variants relate to the phenotypic expression of many common facial features. We conducted genome-wide association meta-analyses of 20 quantitative facial measurements derived from the 3D surface images of 3118 healthy individuals of European ancestry belonging to two US cohorts. Analyses were performed on just under one million genotyped SNPs (Illumina OmniExpress+Exome v1.2 array) imputed to the 1000 Genomes reference panel (Phase 3). We observed genome-wide significant associations (p < 5 x 10−8) for cranial base width at 14q21.1 and 20q12, intercanthal width at 1p13.3 and Xq13.2, nasal width at 20p11.22, nasal ala length at 14q11.2, and upper facial depth at 11q22.1. Several genes in the associated regions are known to play roles in craniofacial development or in syndromes affecting the face: MAFB, PAX9, MIPOL1, ALX3, HDAC8, and PAX1. We also tested genotype-phenotype associations reported in two previous genome-wide studies and found evidence of replication for nasal ala length and SNPs in CACNA2D3 and PRDM16. These results provide further evidence that common variants in regions harboring genes of known craniofacial function contribute to normal variation in human facial features. Improved understanding of the genes associated with facial morphology in healthy individuals can provide insights into the pathways and mechanisms controlling normal and abnormal facial morphogenesis.

    ARTICLE

    Shaffer, John R., et al. 2016. "Genome-wide association study reveals multiple loci influencing normal human facial morphology." PLoS Genet 12(8):e1006149. dx.doi.org/10.1[...]06149

    Submitter

    EXCERPT

    Now, a team of Liggins Institute researchers have shown for the first time that human mitochondrial DNA leaves the mitochondria, travels into the host cell nucleus and connects to specific genes.

    "We found evidence that mitochondria DNA and nuclear DNA 'talk to each other', and these interactions aren't random," says lead researcher Dr Justin O'Sullivan, a molecular geneticist at the University of Auckland research institute.

    The findings give weight to the idea that mitochondria do much more than supply energy and regulate a cell's metabolism – the processes that keep it alive.
    Source: medicalxpress.com/news[...].html

    ARTICLE

    Doynova, M.D., et al. 2016. "Interactions between mitochondrial and nuclear DNA in mammalian cells are non-random." Mitochondrion. dx.doi.org/10.1[...]8.003
    Resources: Cello: Genetic circuit design automation
    Submitted by Prashanth Suravajhala; posted on Thursday, August 25, 2016

    Submitter

    EXCERPT

    The Cello input is a high-level logic specification written in Verilog, a hardware description language. The code is parsed to generate a truth table, and logic synthesis produces a circuit diagram with the genetically available gate types to implement the truth table. The gates in the circuit are assigned using experimentally characterized genetic gates. In assignment, a predicted circuit score guides a breadth-first search, or a Monte Carlo simulated annealing search. The assignment with the highest score is chosen, and this assignment can be physically implemented in a combinatorial number of different genetic layouts. The Eugene language is used for rule-based constrained combinatorial design of one or more final DNA sequence(s) for the designed circuit.

    AVAILABILITY

    www.cellocad.org
    github.com/CIDARLAB/cello

    ARTICLE

    Nielsen, Alec A.K., et al. 2016. "Genetic circuit design automation." Science 352(6281). dx.doi.org/10.1[...]c7341

    February 21-23, 2017
    Porto, Portugal
    www.bioinformatics.biostec.org

    SCOPE

    The purpose of the International Conference on Bioinformatics Models, Methods and Algorithms is to bring together researchers and practitioners interested in the application of computational systems, algorithmic concepts and information technologies to address challenging problems in Biomedical research with a particular focus on the emerging problems in Bioinformatics and computational biology. There is a tremendous need to explore how mathematical, statistical and computational models can be used to better understand biological processes and systems, while developing new methodologies and tools to analysis the massive currently-available biological data. Areas of interest to this community include systems biology, sequence analysis, biostatistics, image analysis, network and graph models, scientific data management and data mining, machine learning, pattern recognition, computational evolutionary biology, computational genomics and proteomics, and related areas.

    IMPORTANT DATES

    Regular Papers:
    Paper Submission: September 29, 2016
    Authors Notification: November 23, 2016
    Camera Ready and Registration: December 9, 2016

    Position Papers:
    Paper Submission: November 8, 2016
    Authors Notification: December 14, 2016
    Camera Ready and Registration: December 27, 2016

    Workshops:
    Workshop Proposal: November 3, 2016

    Doctoral Consortium:
    Paper Submission: December 29, 2016
    Authors Notification: January 11, 2017
    Camera Ready and Registration: January 23, 2017

    Special Sessions:
    Special Session Proposal: November 21, 2016

    Tutorials, Demos and Panels Proposals: December 27, 2016

    Submitter

    EXCERPT

    A team of Japanese doctors turned to IBM's AI system, Watson for help after the treatment for an 60-year-old woman suffering from leukaemia proved unsuccessful. The AI was successfully able to find out that she actually suffered from a different, rare form of leukaemia, as the disease had gone undetected using conventional methods by the doctors.
    Source: www.techworm.net/2016[...].html

    Submitter

    December 8-10, 2016
    Houston, Texas, USA
    www.uth.edu/cph/icibm/

    You are invited to submit papers with unpublished original work describing recent advances on all aspects of bioinformatics, systems biology, intelligent computing, and biomedical informatics.

    IMPORTANT DATES

    Deadline for paper submission: August 15, 2016 (extended)
    Notification to authors of papers: September 15, 2016
    Notification to authors of highlight paper: October 1, 2016
    Deadline for abstract submission: September 24, 2016
    Notification to authors of abstracts: October 1, 2016
    Conference early registration: October 1, 2016
    Conference early registration deadline: October 31, 2016
    ICIBM conference: December 8-10, 2016

    PAPER SUBMISSION & PUBLICATION

    Prospective authors are invited to submit unpublished work to ICIBM 2016. All papers and abstracts will be submitted through EasyChair Conference System. Detailed information is available through: easychair.org/conf[...]20160

    All submitted papers will be peer-reviewed. The accepted papers of registered authors will be published in special issues of several journals, including BMC Systems Biology, BMC Genomics, BMC Bioinformatics, BMC Biomedical Informatics and Decision Making, and International Journal of Computational Biology and Drug Design. Authors need to prepare manuscripts in the format of the corresponding journal that they prefer.

    TRAVEL AWARDS

    Up to 20 travel awards are available to students/postdocs; awards will be granted through an NSF grant. A certificate will be given to each awardee during conference.

    Submitter

    October 2, 2016
    Seattle, WA (as part of ACM-BCB: acm-bcb.org)
    www.sci.utah.edu/~bei[...]2016/

    We are organizing the International Workshop on Topological Data Analysis in Biomedicine (TDA-Bio) as part of the 7th ACM Conference on Bioinformatics, Computational Biology, and Health Informatics (ACM-BCB, acm-bcb.org).

    This workshop will present a concise yet self-contained overview of the key aspects of topological data analysis (TDA), with an eye toward motivating the application of these techniques to problems in bioinformatics and computational biology (BCB) as well as medicine.

    We have assembled an excellent list of speakers. All talks promise to be highly accessible to a general audience who might not have a background in TDA. There will also be a demo session and a panel discussion.

    We expect some funding from NSF to support the participation of US graduate students in the workshop. Graduate students will be required to submit an online application to the organizers outlining their background, research interests, and reasons for why they want to attend TDA-Bio. Students from underrepresented groups are especially encouraged to apply. Please see the conference web page for more info.

    IMPORTANT DATES

    Travel support available for graduate student, application deadline: Aug 12, 2016
    Early registration: Aug 15, 2016
    Research: NY Times: Meet Luca, the ancestor of all living things
    Submitted by J.W. Bizzaro; posted on Tuesday, July 26, 2016

    Submitter

    EXCERPT

    A surprisingly specific genetic portrait of the ancestor of all living things has been generated by scientists who say that the likeness sheds considerable light on the mystery of how life first emerged on Earth.

    This venerable ancestor was a single-cell, bacterium-like organism. But it has a grand name, or at least an acronym. It is known as Luca, the Last Universal Common Ancestor, and is estimated to have lived some four billion years ago, when Earth was a mere 560 million years old.
    Source: www.nytimes.com/2016[...].html

    Submitter

    EXCERPT

    Who's your daddy? An unknown hominin species that bred with early human ancestors when they migrated from Africa to Australasia has been identified through genome mapping of living humans.

    The genome analysis also questions previous findings that modern humans populated Asia in two waves from their origin in Africa, finding instead a common origin for all populations in the Asia-Pacific region, dating back to a single out-of-Africa migration event.
    Source: www.newscientist.com/arti[...]tree/

    Submitter

    EXCERPT

    On Wednesday, in what many experts are calling a milestone in neuroscience, researchers published a spectacular new map of the brain, detailing nearly 100 previously unknown regions – an unprecedented glimpse into the machinery of the human mind.
    [...]
    Scientists created the map with advanced scanners and computers running artificial intelligence programs that "learned" to identify the brain's hidden regions from vast amounts of data collected from hundreds of test subjects, a far more sophisticated and broader effort than had been previously attempted.
    Source: www.nytimes.com/2016[...].html
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