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    Submitter

    EXCERPT

    "As a matter of truth in advertising, the 'finished' sequence isn't finished," said Eric Lander, who led the lab at the Whitehead Institute that deciphered more of the genome for the government-funded Human Genome Project than any other. "I always say 'finished' is a term of art."

    "It's very fair to say the human genome was never fully sequenced," Craig Venter, another genomics luminary, told STAT.

    "The human genome has not been completely sequenced and neither has any other mammalian genome as far as I'm aware," said Harvard Medical School bioengineer George Church, who made key early advances in sequencing technology.
    Source: www.statnews.com/2017[...]nced/
    Events: Global Pharma R&D Informatics Congress
    Submitted by Laura Berry; posted on Tuesday, June 20, 2017

    Nov. 30 - Dec. 1, 2017
    Lisbon, Portugal
    www.global-engage.com/event/global-pharma

    This conference will cover methods and technologies for data management, storage, analysis, and representation. Attendees will hear from pharmaceutical companies about how they are using informatics tools and technologies to speed up their drug discovery and development processes.

    Topics include:
    • Complex data analytics and method development
    • System integration and workflow optimisation
    • AI and machine learning
    • Data storage and management
    To see the full list of topics and speakers, please visit our website.

    Submitter

    EXCERPT

    The cat has long been important to human societies as a pest-control agent, object of symbolic value and companion animal, but little is known about its domestication process and early anthropogenic dispersal. Here we show, using ancient DNA analysis of geographically and temporally widespread archaeological cat remains, that both the Near Eastern and Egyptian populations of Felis silvestris lybica contributed to the gene pool of the domestic cat at different historical times. While the cat's worldwide conquest began during the Neolithic period in the Near East, its dispersal gained momentum during the Classical period, when the Egyptian cat successfully spread throughout the Old World. The expansion patterns and ranges suggest dispersal along human maritime and terrestrial routes of trade and connectivity. A coat-colour variant was found at high frequency only after the Middle Ages, suggesting that directed breeding of cats occurred later than with most other domesticated animals.
    Source: www.nature.com/arti[...]-0139
    Etc.: Pacific Biosciences 2017 Microbial Grant Program
    Submitted by Christian J Olsen; posted on Thursday, June 15, 2017

    We're pleased to announce the 2017 Microbial Grant Program! Submit a 250 word application telling us how SMRT Sequencing can advance your microbiology or infectious disease research for a chance to win.

    One winner will receive SMRTbell library construction, sequencing on the Sequel System, and bioinformatics analysis from our PacBio Certified Service Provider, the Genomics Resource Center (GRC) at the University of Maryland Baltimore.

    Submit your entry by June 30, 2017. Full details on the Microbial SMRT Grant Program: www.pacb.com/smrt[...]2017/

    November 7 & 8, 2017
    The Center of Excellence in Wireless and Information Technology (CEWIT) at Stony Brook University
    Stony Brook, New York, 11794, USA
    www.cewit.org/conference2017

    CEWIT2017 is the premier international forum on the applications of emerging technologies in infrastructure, healthcare, and energy – three of the most critical components of a smarter global environment. Specific topics of interest include, but are not limited to, Internet of Things; Cybersecurity; Big Data Analytics and Visualization; Health Technologies and Medical Devices; Smart Energy; Smart Urban Systems; as well as Technological Applications and Tech Entrepreneurship.

    IMPORTANT DATES

    Abstract Submission Deadline: August 1, 2017
    Conference: November 7 & 8, 2017

    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    Contact: conference[at]cewit.org

    Submitter

    EXCERPT

    Last month, a study was published claiming that the groundbreaking CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing technique could potentially introduce hundreds of unintended mutations into an animal's genome. Unsurprisingly, this study sent shockwaves through the scientific community, with the stock prices from several gene-editing companies falling. Critics are now calling into question the veracity of the study, claiming it is filled with flawed assumptions.
    Source: newatlas.com/cris[...]0001/

    Submitter

    EXCERPT

    Believe it or not, when the Jackson Lab was born in 1929, many researchers didn't believe it was possible to study genetics in mammals, assuming inbreeding in mammals was impossible. A lot has changed in biology and genetics since then, and there are now more mice living at the Jackson Lab than people living in the state of Maine.

    Edison Liu, president and CEO of The Jackson Laboratory, is harnessing the JAX spirit to push the organization – and hopefully the field – toward a more mature understanding of complexity.
    Source: www.bio-itworld.com/2017[...].aspx

    Submitter

    EXCERPT

    Historically, the idea of extracting DNA from an Egyptian mummy has been a bit like trying to suck dinosaur DNA out an insect trapped in amber: a tantalizing prospect, but still more myth than science. "This has been around for a long time as a hot topic," says Johannes Krause, a geneticist at Germany's Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology. But unlike the dino scenario, it turns out analyzing mummy DNA is actually scientifically possible.

    Krause has spent his career teasing information out of very old DNA. His work has led to the discovery of a new subspecies of human, which he helped identify from a bone fragment in a European cave; he also definitively identified the disease behind the infamous Black Death by examining dug-up plague victims. Now he can add another ancient jewel to his list: mummies. His team has managed to extract the first intact DNA from thousands-year-old Egyptian mummies, allowing them to unravel the secrets of their genetic heritage.
    Source: www.smithsonianmag.com/scie[...]3518/

    Submitter

    EXCERPT

    In a significant advance in the study of mental ability, a team of European and American scientists announced on Monday that they had identified 52 genes linked to intelligence in nearly 80,000 people.
    Source: www.nytimes.com/2017[...].html

    Submitter

    EXCERPT

    Research teams looking to crunch massive data sets have had access to IBM's quantum processor through the cloud for about a year, and now the company is upping that power with a new generation of processors. The first, boasting 16 quantum bits (qubits), will increase the processing power available through the cloud, while the second is twice as powerful again and designed as a prototype of a commercial quantum processor.
    Source: newatlas.com/ibm-[...]9590/
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