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    Research: MIT: Artificial intelligence system rapidly predicts how two proteins will attach
    Submitted by J.W. Bizzaro; posted on Tuesday, February 08, 2022

    Submitter

    EXCERPT

    Antibodies, small proteins produced by the immune system, can attach to specific parts of a virus to neutralize it. As scientists continue to battle SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes Covid-19, one possible weapon is a synthetic antibody that binds with the virus' spike proteins to prevent the virus from entering a human cell.

    To develop a successful synthetic antibody, researchers must understand exactly how that attachment will happen. Proteins, with lumpy 3D structures containing many folds, can stick together in millions of combinations, so finding the right protein complex among almost countless candidates is extremely time-consuming.

    To streamline the process, MIT researchers created a machine-learning model that can directly predict the complex that will form when two proteins bind together. Their technique is between 80 and 500 times faster than state-of-the-art software methods, and often predicts protein structures that are closer to actual structures that have been observed experimentally.
    Source: https://news.mit.edu/2022/ai-predicts-protein-docking-0201

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